Report 600
Review of mark-recapture studies on UK seabirds that are run through the BTO’s Retrapping Adults for Survival (RAS) network
(2016)
Catharine Horswill, Ruth H. Walker, Elizabeth M. Humphreys & Robert A. Robinson
This report evaluates the performance of active and non-active seabird projects registered in the BTO’s RAS network.
 

Introduction

 

In the UK, the abundance and breeding success of seabirds are monitored through several coordinated programs that span a large number of colonies. The estimation of survival rates requires individual-based mark-recapture (MR) data that entail significantly more staff time and costs. Consequently, the survival rates of seabird are monitored at considerably fewer sites.

Citizen science projects run through the BTO’s Retrapping Adults for Survival (RAS) network have increased the number of MR studies conducted on seabirds in the UK. This model of citizen science projects, supported by a central co-ordinator, offers the potential to increase the geographic range of survival estimates for seabirds. The studies registered in the network achieve different levels of field effort, and therefore an evaluation of field protocols is necessary in order to minimise the risk that studies fail to achieve targets, such as reliably estimating survival rates.

 
 
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ISSN 0963-8901
 
Please cite as: Catharine Horswill, Ruth H. Walker, Elizabeth M. Humphreys & Robert A. Robinson, (2016), Review of mark-recapture studies on UK seabirds that are run through the BTO’s Retrapping Adults for Survival (RAS) network, JNCC Report 600, ISSN 0963-8901