Publications - Birds and the environment

 

Wetlands International
In March 2010, Wetlands International was contracted by JNCC, on behalf of JNCC and DEFRA, to coordinate the review of the International Waterbird Census
 
Boere. G.C., Galbraith, C.A. & Stroud, D.A. (eds).
This publication gives a telling insight into the status of the world's most important waterbird migration routes and is the outcome of a major international conference.
 
Rowell, H. and Hearn, R.
The Icelandic-breeding Goose Census (IGC) is coordinated by The Wildfowl & Wetlands Trust (WWT) and has been conducted annually since 1960; it relies principally on a network of dedicated volunteer observers to collect data. The results are published by The Wildfowl & Wetlands Trust, in partnership with JNCC.
 
BTO
This annual report summarises the work BTO carries out under eight programmes of survey and research
 
Hearn, R.
The Icelandic-breeding Goose Census (IGC) is coordinated by The Wildfowl & Wetlands Trust (WWT) and has been conducted annually since 1960; it relies principally on a network of dedicated volunteer observers to collect data. The results are published by The Wildfowl & Wetlands Trust, in partnership with JNCC.
 
Musgrove, A.J., Langston, R.H.W., Baker, H. & Ward, R.M.
Low Tide counts were made at 62 different UK estuaries over the period 1992-93 to 1998-99 during the two-hour period either side of low tide once per month from November to February, The results for each of the estuaries are presented as a series of colour maps showing the distribution and densities of selected important species. In addition, maps of the count sections and of the overlap between counted areas and site designation boundaries (for example, Special Protection Areas) are included. For each waterbird species recorded during low tide counts, information from across all estuaries is summarised.
 
British Trust for Ornithology
This report covers BTO work under the JNCC/BTO Partnership during 2001-02, including much collation and analysis of studies for which the fieldwork was undertaken in previous years. The two main sections of the report present the chief conclusion drawn from the Partnership's programme in 2001/02 (Section B) and the means by which the work was delivered (Section C)
 
The 41st consecutive census of Pink-footed Geese and Icelandic Greylag Geese took place in Britain and Ireland during autumn and early winter 2000. Two discrete counts were undertaken and coverage of sites was good. Both counts were carried out under favourable weather conditions. Maxima of 242,419 Pink-footed Geese and 81,097 Greylag Geese were recorded in October and November, respectively. When adjusted to account for major sites that were not counted and numbers of UK Greylag Geese, population estimates of 245,349 Pink-Footed Geese and 80,324 Greylag Geese were derived. Both population estimates are greater than those calculated in 1999, although not directly comparable because the methods used to derive the adjusted population estimates are new. The Pink-footed Goose estimate represents an increase of 15.5% over the 1999 peak count and the Greylag Goose estimate an increase of 5.8%. Both species had a more successful breeding season than average: Pink-footed Goose flocks contained 18.7% young and mean brood size was 2.15 goslings per successful pair and Greylag Goose flocks contained 20.9% young and mean brood size was 2.48 goslings per successful pair. The average proportion of young between 1990-99 was 17.6% in Pink-footed Geese flocks and 16.7% in Icelandic Greylag Geese.
 
Donald, P.F. & Aebischer, N.J.
Papers from a 1994 symposium on the decline in population of the corn-bunting Miliaria calandra. The papers propose a conservation action plan for the corn-bunting, which is among the most rapidly declining species of farmland seed-eating birds, as highlighted by the UK Biodiversity Steering Group.
 
Campbell, L. & Cooke, A.S.
Summarises the evidence that pesticide use indirectly affects bird populations, particularly through their food supplies; based on a review compiled for the Dept. of Environment and the JNCC by a consortium of conservation and research organisations.
 

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