Monitoring and Surveillance Reports

The following list of reports has been produced by the Marine Biodiversity Monitoring R&D Programme:
 
Noble-James, T., Jesus, A. & McBreen, F.
This guidance aims to supply the reader with the information necessary to develop robust benthic monitoring programmes and answer monitoring questions with a high level of confidence.
 
Eggleton, J., Murray, J., McIlwaine, P., Mason, C., Noble-James, T., Hinchen, H., Nelson, M., McBreen, F., Ware, S. & Whomersley, P.
This report describes the findings of a dedicated survey which was carried out between 17th May and 6th June 2014 on the RV Cefas Endeavour.
 
Report 540: A review of monitoring and assessment of seabed habitats in UK inshore Marine Protected Areas, 1999 - 2013 (2016)
McBreen, F., Jesus, A., Camplin, M., Clark, L., Edwards, H., Pirie, C., James, B., Young, M., Steel, L., Johnston, C. & Hawkridge, J.
JNCC staff visited each of the CNCBs between August and October 2012 to ask a series of questions related to the monitoring and assessment of seabed habitats undertaken in inshore MPAs. The current report summarises JNCC’s conclusions from these meetings, supplemented by further discussions and additional information subsequently provided by the CNCBs.
 
Murray, J., Jenkins, C., Eggleton, J., Whomersley, P., Robson, L., Flavell, B. & Hinchen, H.
The Marine (Scotland) Act 2010, and the UK Marine and Coastal Access Act 2009, gave powers to Scottish Ministers to designate Nature Conservation MPAs in Scotland’s seas as part of a range of measures to manage and protect Scotland’s seas for current and future generations. JNCC and Scottish Natural Heritage applied the Site Selection Guidelines to identify NCMPAs that, together with existing protected areas, will form a network of MPAs.
 
Moore, J., Bunker, F., van Rein, H. & Jones, J.
As consistency in recording has long been an issue with in situ monitoring of benthic communities the decision was taken to examine this issue within the JNCC dive team's programme of work
 
Report 560 Conceptual Ecological Modelling of Sublittoral Rock Habitats to Inform Indicator Selection (2015)
Alexander, D., Coates, D. A., Tillin, H. & Tyler-Walters, H.
In order to manage the marine environment effectively, it is necessary for decision makers to have access to suitable tools for identifying the state of marine biodiversity, and where a change in state occurs, to identify possible manageable causes. The use of indicators provides one such method, as a proxy for ecological status.
 
Report 557 Conceptual Ecological Modelling of Shallow Sublittoral Mud Habitats to Inform Indicator Selection (2015)
Coates, D.A., Alexander, D., Stafford, R. & Herbert, R.J.H.
The purpose of this report is to produce a series of Conceptual Ecological Models (CEMs) that represent the shallow sublittoral mud habitat in the UK. CEMs are diagrammatic representations of the influences and processes that occur within an ecosystem. The models can be used to identify critical aspects of an ecosystem that may be developed for further study, or serve as the basis for the selection of indicators for environmental monitoring purposes. The models produced by this project are ‘control diagrams’, representing the unimpacted state of the environment, free from anthropogenic pressures.
 
Howell, K.L., Huvenne, V., Piechaud, N., Robert, K. & Ross, R.E.
The JC060 cruise was the first, dedicated, deep-water habitat-mapping cruise of the MAREMAP initiative (UK Marine Environmental Mapping Programme). MAREMAP is an initiative aiming to promote integrated surveys by the following NERC organisations and partners: the National Oceanography Centre (NOC); the British Geological Survey (BGS); and the Scottish Association of Marine Science (SAMS), the University of Southampton, Channel Coastal Observatory, Plymouth University (PU), the Maritime and Coastguard Agency (MCA) and the Centre for Environment, Fisheries & Aquaculture Science (CEFAS). The MAREMAP cruise aimed to target four areas of study: the Darwin Mounds in the North Rockall Trough, East Rockall Bank Cliff habitats, the Hatton Basin polygonal faults and fisheries impacts on North-West Rockall Bank.
 
Alexander, D., Colcombe, A., Chambers, C. & Herbert, R.J.H.
The purpose of this study is to produce a series of Conceptual Ecological Models (CEMs) that represent the Shallow Sublittoral Coarse Sediment Habitat in the UK. CEMs are diagrammatic representations of the influences and processes that occur within an ecosystem. They can be used to identify critical aspects of an ecosystem that may be taken forward for further study, or serve as the basis for the selection of indicators for environmental monitoring purposes. The models produced by this project are ‘control diagrams’, representing the state of the environment free from adverse anthropogenic impacts and pressures.
 
Robson, L.
The UK has responsibilities under a number of different legislative obligations to survey and monitor marine biodiversity across UK waters, and to assess and report on the conservation status of this biodiversity. Such assessments will provide evidence on the state of biodiversity both within Marine Protected Areas (MPAs) and across the wider UK marine environment and identify where progress is being made in its protection.
 
Brewer, M. & Holtrop, G.
Using two case studies this report identifies trends in species diversity and explores options for sampling strategies for baseline monitoring surveys.
 
Parry, M., Tierney, M., Wood, L., Stanwell-Smith, D., Northen, K., Abdulla, A., Corrigan, C., Gassner, P. & Fletcher, L.
The UK is committed to establishing an ecologically coherent network of Marine Protected Areas (MPAs) by 2012.
 
Addison, P.
This review evaluates some key long-term MPA monitoring programmes from around the world against a good monitoring framework. The report highlights several issues concerned with these monitoring programmes. The current issues with these monitoring programmes and lessons learned from other fields of marine and environmental research are relevant to all types of environmental monitoring. These lessons should help improve the scientific credibility and success of current and upcoming marine monitoring programmes.
 

Older monitoring reports:

 
Hiscock, K
This report is a contribution to the development of a monitoring handbook of the UK Marine SACs Project.
 
Hiscock, K and Kimmance, S
If monitoring is to be effective in providing information on the success or failure of site management measures then it is imperative that it is assessed in the context of long-term trends over a broad spatial scale, and from this a coordinated network of long-term reference monitoring sites can be established. In order to do this we needed to identify organisations that are carrying out time-series studies to identify the sufficiency of time-series monitoring and gaps in coverage. Ninety-two seabed biological surveys that include time-series data have been identified, and a description of each study entered to a Microsoft® Access time-series database available as front page web browsers. All of the 92 datasets reviewed and detailed in the database include some information useful for interpreting temporal change and of these 36 datasets that include data collected in a systematic manner over many years are identified that could form a part of a network of surveillance sites in the UK.
 

Return to Graphics version

| JNCC - Adviser to Government on Nature Conservation | Site Map | Search | Legal | Feedback | List Access Keys |